Locale

1) Irving Centre trees leafing out copyAcadia University is a small undergraduate university well-known in Canada for its high quality,personalized education. The campus is situated in picturesque Wolfville, Nova Scotia surrounded by productive agricultural land and the world’s highest tides. The conference is based at the K.C. Irving Environmental Sciences Centre and the Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens on  Acadia’s charming campus. The Centre is the signature building of the university— comfortable, elegant and traditional, with a beautiful attached Conservatory and research greenhouse. In addition to the indoor facility space we will be utilizing an outdoor stTrailsage and a Palace Yurt conveniently located within the adjacent Gardens. The surrounding six acres of native plants are organized by nine representative habitats found within the Acadian Forest Region. Just beyond the garden gate are Acadia’s woodland trails, which will be integrated into the conference program offering wild space to explore.

Palace yurt at night Scott Thieu Photography-001

The town of Wolfville   resides in unceded Mi’kmaw territory and is situated facing a magnificent view of Cape Blomidon. The Cape is the home of Glooscap, the creation spirit of the Mi’kmaq. Wolfville has approximately 4000 residents and nearly doubles in population when Acadia students are on hand. The community features a vibrant year-round Farmer’s Market, which will host the conference for a memorable and special supper. Wolfville is home to the innovative Acadia Cinema Co-op, which owns the Al Whittle Theatre in partnership with the Just Us Coffee Roasters Co-op. Just Us was the first fair trade coffee roaster in Canada with headquarters and a Fair Trade Coffee Museum located 5 minutes from town. You will discover a diverse array of small and innovative businesses, from restaurants and pubs to craft and clothing stores.

A short bus or bike ride down the road is the Grand Pré UNESCO World Heritage Site, the focal point for experiencing the story of Acadian peoples in Atlantic Canada. The dykes, first built by the Acadians in the 1600s, protect the town from the tides and are a haven for shorebirds. They start in the heart of town and provide a magnificent walk into the coastal ecosystem.

A short bus or bike ride down the road is the Grand Pré UNESCO World Heritage Site, the focal point for experiencing the story of Acadian peoples in Atlantic Canada. The earthen dykes in Wolfville and mBasinuch of the surrounding area were first built by the Acadians in the 1600s, protect the town from the tides, and are a haven for shorebirds. They can be accessed from the heart of town and offer a beautiful walk into the coastal ecosystem.

Wolfville is surrounded by small farms and vineyards, and is a hub for innovative and sustainable agriculture. The area is home to the Centre for Small Farms and Tap Root Farms, two excellent and progressive leaders in supporting local initiatives. Tap Root Farms is pioneering the growing and processing of flax for linen and clothes in Atlantic Canada in addition to the farm’s 52 week a year CSA program.

Wolfville is located within Kings County, which boasts perhaps the most comprehensive waste management system in Canada including complete curb pick up, composting and recycling for building materials. Styrofoam, asphalt, and aluminum foil are also readily recycled by the county and most community members take waste management seriously. In truly leading by example, the Valley Waste offices are built of re-used materials.

Close by is Blue Beach, a treasure trove of fossils from the crucial time period in which organisms were beginning to live on land.

Be assured we will be building lots of opportunities to get out and explore into the pre-conference and conference activities.